Technical Trail Features Reference Thread

Trail Building and Design discussion. This was formerly the restricted access MMBA/REI trail school program forum.

Re: Technical Trail Features Reference Thread

Postby ChrisInYpsi » October 14th, 2013, 8:42 pm

AllMountin' wrote:this ride in... Pennsylvania!

Kewl. I spent a week riding various PA trails this summer. Mostly central PA (grippis, Rothrock, etc) and the Pocono region.

You'll like Rothrock if you haven't already ridden it. And if you make it out to the NE part of the state check out Prompton. It doesn't get much press, but it's like a 15 mile boulder field. Was an amazing trail, and I'm not ashamed to say that it whooped me.
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Re: Technical Trail Features Reference Thread

Postby rvd » October 14th, 2013, 8:46 pm

xcrdr wrote:
AllMountin' wrote:Back from the dead. I guess nobody rides features anymore... :-(

...



Nice fake video! Where is the real one? :)


Give the man some time :-). I bet we can all watch it here soon: http://vimeo.com/user10300014
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Re: Technical Trail Features Reference Thread

Postby xcrdr » October 14th, 2013, 9:18 pm

rvd wrote:
xcrdr wrote:
AllMountin' wrote:Back from the dead. I guess nobody rides features anymore... :-(

...



Nice fake video! Where is the real one? :)


Give the man some time :-). I bet we can all watch it here soon: http://vimeo.com/user10300014



Alright then. You know when you see the little "play" icon you want to hit it too!
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Re: Technical Trail Features Reference Thread

Postby AllMountin' » October 16th, 2013, 1:32 am

ChrisInYpsi wrote:
AllMountin' wrote:this ride in... Pennsylvania!


You'll like Rothrock if you haven't already ridden it. And if you make it out to the NE part of the state check out Prompton. It doesn't get much press, but it's like a 15 mile boulder field. Was an amazing trail, and I'm not ashamed to say that it whooped me.


I've been to Rothrock, and ridden Tussey Mtn, Lonberger, up to Bald Knob, and a bunch of others with a local rider. I liked the nasty rock gardens, the views from the burnout zone, and the bigger rock features. Overall, I felt a little beat up on the HT, and wished I was on a FS bike.

Prompton is on the hit list whenever I make it back to the Eastern half of PA. I've ridden Merli-Sarnoski in the area, and have heard Moosic Mtn is a must ride as well. I honestly think I could do a solid two or three week trip in PA alone. The WISS by Philly is supposed to be awesome as well. Mt Penn...

stinkychamois wrote: I really want to try some of these things but I am not sure where to start as I don't see very many of these features to try


That's a tough one to answer. I can say that I have personally never been to Rays, and think it would be hard to make meaningful progression solely based on that without driving down every weekend. I have been riding for roughly three years, and since the beginning I've made a point of attempting most everything and embracing the technical challenge of the sport. The feature shown really isn't much different than taking a drop off a sidewalk, except the margin for error is a lot smaller and the consequences higher. It's just a matter of lining up the drop, preload the front with your body weight as you approach the edge, shift your weight back just before/as the front tire leaves the ground to keep it from dropping before the rear wheel clears the edge, whilst pushing the bike out in front of your body. Some combination of that will roll you off most drops safely. The slower the drop, the more aggressive you'll need to be, since you'll need to keep the front up longer.

Use whatever is available to you locally. In my town, I have any number of curbs, cement foundations of burnt down buildings, and other platforms to practice on, and I use them as part of my local rides. Start small and work your way up.

The key to riding skinnies w/out fear of injury or broken parts is to master the wheelie drop. That you could practice by riding parallel to a curb edge, turn slightly and do a wheelie, dropping down to road level. If you can do that, in both directions and consistently, you can control the outcome when coming off of a skinny. When you feel you're losing balance, instead of falling or crunching a RD hanger, turn and wheelie off it, back to ground level.

I also find that the best rock gardens are not on trails. I use a rocky creek bed for practice, and an off camber cement and rock mixture next to a river, for example. Practice on stairs. Use downed trees for log over practice. I also use massive landscaping boulders on public property for practicing the exact skills you utilize in a place like PA. You just have to use discretion regarding when and where you ride these things, so as to not be seen as a public menace. :-)

In short, be creative, and keep an eye out for opportunity, on or off trail. The last piece is simply confidence. You can ride off a thousand curbs, but when you go to ride a drop like this for the first time, part of you will want to hold back and be tentative. Riding that drop half *beep* will land you in the hurt locker real quick. There is a fine line between trying new things to improve yourself and doing stupid things that will get you hurt. I crossed that line a lot in my first couple years, and have been relatively lucky. This year I've progressed the most, but crashed the least. Be smart about it, and try to learn things in order.

That's about the best I can do via the interwebz. When I do up my next report for my current trip, you'll realize that the bit about risk mitigation is blatant hypocrisy.
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Re: Technical Trail Features Reference Thread

Postby AllMountin' » April 22nd, 2014, 7:31 am

Starting to blur the line between what is a trail feature vs a big piece of deadfall strategically placed in a rideable position. This is a Schooner Trace sized(a bit under 2 feet) step up to skinny(wide). Hopkins Lake yellow trail.



I shaved the edges, cut grip grooves, and wedged it in place to make it slightly more bike friendly.
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Re: Technical Trail Features Reference Thread

Postby jfactor! » May 29th, 2015, 3:20 pm

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