Fat Bike racks for trail maintenance

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Re: Fat Bike racks for trail maintenance

Postby c0nsumer » April 14th, 2014, 5:26 pm

I've tried loading such things on a rack on a 26" MTB and not had much luck. I think the better option is something like a BOB trailer. I think you can make one of these work with a Surly fatbike, but they don't (currently) work with any of the wider rear end bikes.

This is the method I'd prefer, as then I could just pull a trailer full of tools out into the woods. Instead I just walk.
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Re: Fat Bike racks for trail maintenance

Postby glr » April 15th, 2014, 12:28 pm

jer091 wrote:I would be interested in something like this. I believe it was a custom fabrication.

Image


That looks awesome! I would be interested in this as well. I like how they mounted the saw like that, I suppose some hedge trimmers would fit well in there to.

Greg, are you affixing the golf bag to your bike? Not a bad thought either. To be honest that would probably be the only time I would be interested in anything involving golf!
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Re: Fat Bike racks for trail maintenance

Postby G.Cook » April 15th, 2014, 12:48 pm

Just bought the cart and the bag . Tools fit in great . I get a kick out of the confused looks from mtn.bikers when I'm working the Poto . :wink: The cart gets a little tippy in the treanched out spots but otherwise no problem .
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Re: Fat Bike racks for trail maintenance

Postby c0nsumer » April 15th, 2014, 12:58 pm

G.Cook wrote:Just bought the cart and the bag . Tools fit in great . I get a kick out of the confused looks from mtn.bikers when I'm working the Poto . :wink: The cart gets a little tippy in the treanched out spots but otherwise no problem .


Do you have any photos of how you attached it to the bike?
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Re: Fat Bike racks for trail maintenance

Postby G.Cook » April 15th, 2014, 1:33 pm

Sorry but I walk that set up to the work site . Thats why I got the bike tool trailer from Surly . It's just another option to get the tools I need to the work site.
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Re: Fat Bike racks for trail maintenance

Postby c0nsumer » April 15th, 2014, 1:37 pm

G.Cook wrote:Sorry but I walk that set up to the work site . Thats why I got the bike tool trailer from Surly . It's just another option to get the tools I need to the work site.


Ohhh, sorry. Still, that's a great idea. I'm going to have to dig up an old bag and cart.
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Re: Fat Bike racks for trail maintenance

Postby davedejonge » April 15th, 2014, 1:44 pm

Unless you have a massive chain saw, or power trimmers, you should be able to throw it all in a larger backpack.
I've ridden with my 18" chain saw in my backpack on Proud Lake before. The chain end can point out the top of the backpack

Its a little heavy by the end of the ride, but, certainly easier than walking. Not near as cool looking as that fatty though.
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Re: Fat Bike racks for trail maintenance

Postby G.Cook » April 15th, 2014, 2:59 pm

Unless you have a massive chain saw, or power trimmers, you should be able to throw it all in a larger backpack.
I've ridden with my 18" chain saw in my backpack on Proud Lake before. The chain end can point out the top of the backpack

Its a little heavy by the end of the ride, but, certainly easier than walking. Not near as cool looking as that fatty though.

Thats why I put the rack on back of the MukLuk for the small Stihl . Tired of hauling that saw around on my back along with all the other chainsaw gear I might need for the job .
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Re: Fat Bike racks for trail maintenance

Postby sisu » April 15th, 2014, 3:32 pm

I use a two wheeled Nomad trailer by Burley. Hooks to left chainstay. Much more comfortable than the chainsaw in the backpack, esp if I'm covering a lot of ground.
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Re: Fat Bike racks for trail maintenance

Postby RNP » March 27th, 2017, 10:37 pm

I'm kinda of late to the party, but here's what I have been using. I mounted the chainsaw to the bike. Used a handlebar bag as a rear pannier. I carry gas in the bottle cage under the downtube. With this setup I can carry bar oil, chain file, 2 bucking wedges, hammer, 1/4 gal (1 liter) gas, 1/2 gal (2 liters) drink mix, and lunch.

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Re: Fat Bike racks for trail maintenance

Postby reidabel » April 23rd, 2017, 9:15 pm

I like the look of that! My own setup, which is mainly for stunt building, is as follows:

left handlebar: chainsaw (14" Poulan, will cut a 28" log), bar pointing away from the bike, handle hooked over the bike's left handlebar, supporting the weight.
right handlebar: large tool bag, containing:

hammer, chisel, nails, cordless circular saw with extra battery, flat file, round file, extra chain, measuring tape, orange marking tape, thermos of milk, lunch, a foam brush, deck waterproofer in a cat spray bottle, roofing nails, extra warning signs.

It's not great for riding between tight trees, but otherwise it's fine once you're used to it. Your setup is much better for riding, but I never have to go more than a couple of miles, so it works for me.

I leave an old junker rake and shovel at the build site, well-hidden.

I never pack extra gas or bar oil, since I don't work long enough in one shot to need them.

When I am transporting lumber I do it just like this, but add up to 6 8-foot 2x4's from the seat to the center of the handlebars, strapped together and to the bike seat/frame because I am so sick of the lumber falling off and causing a big hassle to get it all set up again!
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Re: Fat Bike racks for trail maintenance

Postby ScottKillingbeck » September 10th, 2018, 3:07 pm

Could save a bunch of weight and space by going electric... I help out with ATV trail maintenance and one of the guys in that club uses a one-hand cordless reciprocating saw with a long wood blade on it. Works absolutely awesome for small trees and limbs. It will cut up to about an 8 inch tree very quickly. You could probably cut something bigger in a pinch as long as you have the ambition. Much better than carrying a chain saw around in my opinion! Obviously a spare battery is going to take up less space than gasoline too. No oil to bother with. Extra blades are small and light. I was carrying around a 36v Makita electric chainsaw myself, but after having seen the reciprocating saw in action I think the compact size has the chainsaw beat for everything except major clearing after wind storms.
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Re: Fat Bike racks for trail maintenance

Postby b_b » September 11th, 2018, 7:22 pm

ScottKillingbeck wrote:Could save a bunch of weight and space by going electric...

Recently picked up Dewalt battery hedge trimmer for wife. Really impressed. Works great and runs plenty long on 5amp 20V battery. Does everything we need and is lighter and easier to operate than gas. Gas still has its place when more power and run time are needed, but battery is great for most. Ours also uses standard 20V Dewalt drill batteries readily available for reasonable cost, but one 5amp battery has been fine.
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Re: Fat Bike racks for trail maintenance

Postby reidabel » September 28th, 2018, 7:22 pm

Interesting. I have a cordless reciprocating saw that came in my Porter Cable set, and I've never even tried it. I use the circular saw a lot and the drill once in a while. It certainly would be a lot easier to deal with than the chainsaw, both in packing for the journey, and in riding it out to the cutting area. I'll have to try it out ...

For the chainsaw, I've recently switched from regular bar/chain oil to canola oil after doing a bit of research online. It's been working fine, I'm going to stick with it. Meijer sells it in a container about the size of a Coke bottle, so it's pretty convenient, too. Better for the environment ...
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Re: Fat Bike racks for trail maintenance

Postby Roy » October 2nd, 2018, 8:04 am

I like the idea of using vegi oil in the chain saw - if it works - but I don not think it will!

The chain might stretch and the bar wear out very fast.
Vegi. oil will turn to varnish and will gum up both the chain and the bar.
( all vegi, oils have double bonds between the carbon links, which break open and cross link and form varnish - like Linseed oil )
A new chain and bar cost a lot of $$$$.
Do not believe much of what you read on the internet. The saw manufacture has a whole team of engineers and scientists who spec. the bar oil based on metallurgy and years and years of in field testing. If you don't believe the user manual, stop an ask a professional tree cutter what bar oil they use.

Hey, they might say they use vegi. oil.


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